Sunday, June 19, 2016

Can You Bring Camping Stove Fuel On A Plane?

The fuel? No. The stove itself/lighter? Yes. This was an important question I had when preparing to fly out to Utah last fall to backpack its national parks. To avoid the hassle and confusion I just checked my Primus Express Stove in my pack, left the propane tanks at home and bought new ones at a local gear shop in Moab upon arrival.

Why? The tanks of camping stove fuel we use are filled to the brim with propane and are very combustible at extreme temperatures. Obviously we don't want that happening in the cargo belly of a Boeing 737. So, save yourself the headache and questioning from the TSA and buy the fuel when you land. 

What about the stove assembly itself? You can bring this on a plane (either checked or carry-on, but it has to be empty/clean/free of vapor from the propane cooking gas). It has be washed with clean, clear water and soap prior to flying. There cannot be any residue or evidence of cooking gas on or in the stove assembly.

What about lighters or matches? Technically you can, per TSA rules, bring a book of matches or a lighter containing flammable butane gas (like the cheap plastic colorful ones you'd buy for a dollar, not a Zippo) on an airplane without having to check them in baggage. Weird right? But rules and regulations change all the time so I'd gust avoid it all together and spend a few bucks at the gear shop when your feet are on the ground

According to the FAA "Propane, white gas, Coleman fuel, Sterno, solid fuels, stoves containing fuel. This description includes all camping fuels such as white gas, Coleman fuel, naphtha, petroleum distillates, propane, butane, Sterno, etc. No amount of flammable fuel can be carried, including even residual vapors. Camping equipment that contains no residual fuel, vapors or other hazardous materials is allowed. Some airlines will not carry used camping equipment that has had fuel in it regardless of how well it has been purged."  

Southwest Airlines, Delta, Iceland Air and Cathay Pacific, to name a few, have similar policies. 
Share:

Can You Bring Camping Stove Fuel On A Plane?

The fuel? No. The stove itself/lighter? Yes. This was an important question I had when preparing to fly out to Utah last fall to backpack its national parks. To avoid the hassle and confusion I just checked my Primus Express Stove in my pack, left the propane tanks at home and bought new ones at a local gear shop in Moab upon arrival.

Why? The tanks of camping stove fuel we use are filled to the brim with propane and are very combustible at extreme temperatures. Obviously we don't want that happening in the cargo belly of a Boeing 737. So, save yourself the headache and questioning from the TSA and buy the fuel when you land. 

What about the stove assembly itself? You can bring this on a plane (either checked or carry-on, but it has to be empty/clean/free of vapor from the propane cooking gas). It has be washed with clean, clear water and soap prior to flying. There cannot be any residue or evidence of cooking gas on or in the stove assembly.

What about lighters or matches? Technically you can, per TSA rules, bring a book of matches or a lighter containing flammable butane gas (like the cheap plastic colorful ones you'd buy for a dollar, not a Zippo) on an airplane without having to check them in baggage. Weird right? But rules and regulations change all the time so I'd gust avoid it all together and spend a few bucks at the gear shop when your feet are on the ground

According to the FAA "Propane, white gas, Coleman fuel, Sterno, solid fuels, stoves containing fuel. This description includes all camping fuels such as white gas, Coleman fuel, naphtha, petroleum distillates, propane, butane, Sterno, etc. No amount of flammable fuel can be carried, including even residual vapors. Camping equipment that contains no residual fuel, vapors or other hazardous materials is allowed. Some airlines will not carry used camping equipment that has had fuel in it regardless of how well it has been purged."  

Southwest Airlines, Delta, Iceland Air and Cathay Pacific, to name a few, have similar policies.

Cheers,
Robby
Share:

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Havenwoods State Forest, WI


This is Milwaukee's best-kept outdoors secret. Period.

You guys, we have an incredibly beautiful state forest right in Milwaukee, and it's called Havenwoods. Located on the city's north side, south of Brown Deer and just minutes west of Glendale is this quiet, 237-acre utopia of forests, wetlands and grasslands. It's Wisconsin's only urban state forest and a humongous surprise.

Havenwood's history is definently bizarre. In the early 1800s, Native Americans hunted on this land. European settlers arrived and started to cultivate the land in the 1840s, draining the wetlands which created the present-day Lincoln Creek. Fast-forward seventy years and the property became a house of corrections until 1945 when the US Army turned it into a barracks for troops and even housed a Nike missile launch site. In 1980, the Wisconsin DNR restored it and made it this stunning protected state forest we see today. 

Having been to the Peshtigo River, Point Beech and Kettle Moraine State Forests- I was looking forward all week to going and exploring Havenwoods for a few hours. There are more than six miles of trails that take you through shaded patches of forest with towering oaks, on boardwalks over small ponds and even a 120-ft bridge that spans the creek. What I loved, is that in hustling, bustling Milwaukee- there's a place you could just go and easily escape into this plot of nature nestled between industrial and urban lots. It was so quiet, relaxing and serene. A 'Nemophilist' is said to be someone who is a hunter of the woods; one who loves the forest and its beauty and solitude. Of course I consider myself one, totally geeking out and "Whoa!"-ing at all the trees and biodiversity at Havenwoods.

Plenty of other people were there too hiking, jogging and birding.  Don't miss the nature center and all its upcoming events! The Environmental Awareness Center is open during the week from 7:45am to 4:30pm and 9am to 2pm on Saturdays. three other seasons are going to transform this place into a show of colors and I can't wait to come back and see it blazen orange in the fall and blanketed in white snow this winter. The city of Milwaukee needs more places like Havenwoods, so I'm pretty grateful and proud this forest exists.

I love Havenwoods so much. Go explore Milwaukee's own state forest!


Cheers,
Robby
Havenwoods State Forest
Address= 6141 N. Hopkins Street Milwaukee, WI 53029
Distance from Downtown Milwaukee= 19 min
Admission Fees= Free! One of the few DNR properties you don't need a vehicle sticker.
Hiking= 6 miles of trails on paved, grass and crushed stone
Phone= 414-527-0232


Share:

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Itinerary: Iceland | October 23-November 4, 2016


Tickets bought! This is happening! I am insanely, astronomically, ludicrously, massively, (insert similar superlatives here) excited to finally make a dream a reality. Iceland has been on my bucket list and my adventure list for years. Hours have been spent researching, reading other travel blogs, pinning things on Pinterest and planning out this thirteen day trip. For whatever reason, this island plotted in the  north Atlantic just really intrigues and fascinates me. Its sheer beauty and endless wonders outdoors has me hooked. The rough detail right now is to fly into Reykjavic and get lost in the capitol city for two days, then rent a 4x4 and spend the remainder of the trip driving the country's 830-mile Route 1 or commonly known as the "Ring Road." I'll be staying in hostels, bed and breakfasts, camping out and probably sleeping in the back seat one or few times as I attempt to see as many of the national parks, glaciers, volcanoes, hot springs and boatloads more. Stay tuned. Let the countdown to October begin!
Share:

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Shalom Wildlife Sanctuary, WI


Wolves, woodchucks and bears, oh my! Did you know that the Wisconsin's wildest zoo is just north of Milwaukee in Washington County? Ever since 1979,  the Shalom Wildlife Sanctuary, located outside of West Bend, has played home to hundreds of animals both big and small. This quiet, truly beautiful 100-acre protected sanctuary offers three miles of trail for you to either walk or ride (in a rented gold cart). And you guys, this is a place you HAVE to go check out. Where else can you get just feet from Syrian Brown Bears, appropriately named Lewis & Clark, feed and feel the velvet antlers of bold, six-foot tall Elk? My dad and I spent a few hours here and were just so surprised at how amazing this hidden treasure is. A licensed zoo since 2010, Shalom Wildlife Sanctuary gives you the chance to see smaller, well-known animals like the badgers, porcupines, ducks, skunk and turtles along with more rare, larger animals like a cougar named Barrabas, wolves, reindeer, camel, bison, llamas, emu and even a bobcat! Half-way through the guided trail, there's a neat Indian artifiact museum worth a stop at and the zoo's visitor center doubles as one of the world's largest collections of antlers. I could go on, and on, and on about how impressive this place is, but you just have to go visit for yourself to truly appreciate what Shalom has to offer. This definently grabs spot on my 'Favorite Places to Visit in Wisconsin' list. Plus, there are year-round events from pumpkin hunts to a lit-up holiday drive-thru. Get ready to geek out over close-up animal pictures in 3...2...1....

Shalom Wildlife Sanctuary | 1901 Shalom Drive, West Bend WI 53090
Distance from Milwaukee= 49 min
Admission Fees= $10.50 adults, $9.50 seniors, cheaper and free rates for children under 17
Hiking= 3 miles of easy trails past generous animal enclosures and interprtive signs
Phone= 262-338-1310



















Share:

Monday, June 6, 2016